ESOPHAGEAL CANCER

Views : 582

ESOPHAGEAL CANCER

Overview

Esophageal cancer is cancer that occurs in the esophagus - a long, hollow tube that runs from your throat to your stomach. Your esophagus helps move the food you swallow from the back of your throat to your stomach to be digested.

Esophageal cancer usually begins in the cells that line the inside of the esophagus. Esophageal cancer can occur anywhere along the esophagus. More men than women get esophageal cancer.

Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Incidence rates vary within different geographic locations. In some regions, higher rates of esophageal cancer cases may be attributed to tobacco and alcohol use or particular nutritional habits and obesity.

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of esophageal cancer include difficulty swallowing (dysphagia); weight loss without trying; chest pain, pressure or burning; worsening indigestion or heartburn and coughing or hoarseness. Early esophageal cancer typically causes no signs or symptoms.

When to see a doctor

Make an appointment with your doctor if you have any persistent signs and symptoms that worry you. If you've been diagnosed with Barrett's esophagus, a precancerous condition that increases your risk of esophageal cancer caused by chronic acid reflux, ask your doctor what signs and symptoms to watch for that may signal that your condition is worsening.

Screening for esophageal cancer isn't done routinely except for patients with Barrett's esophagus because of a lack of other easily identifiable high-risk groups. If you have Barrett's esophagus, discuss the pros and cons of screening with your doctor.

Causes

It's not exactly clear what causes esophageal cancer. Esophageal cancer occurs when cells in your esophagus develop errors (mutations) in their DNA. The errors make cells grow and divide out of control. The accumulating abnormal cells form a tumor in the esophagus that can grow to invade nearby structures and spread to other parts of the body.

Types of esophageal cancer

Esophageal cancer is classified according to the type of cells that are involved. The type of esophageal cancer you have helps determine your treatment options. Types of esophageal cancer include:

  • Adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma begins in the cells of mucus-secreting glands in the esophagus. Adenocarcinoma occurs most often in the lower portion of the esophagus. Adenocarcinoma is the most common form of esophageal cancer in the United States, and it affects primarily white men.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma. The squamous cells are flat, thin cells that line the surface of the esophagus. Squamous cell carcinoma occurs most often in the upper and middle portions of the esophagus. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most prevalent esophageal cancer worldwide.

  • Other rare types. Some rare forms of esophageal cancer include small cell carcinoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, melanoma and choriocarcinoma.

Risk factors

It's thought that chronic irritation of your esophagus may contribute to the changes that cause esophageal cancer. Factors that cause irritation in the cells of your esophagus and increase your risk of esophageal cancer include having gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), smoking, having precancerous changes in the cells of the esophagus (Barrett's esophagus), being obese, drinking alcohol, having bile reflux, having difficulty swallowing because of an esophageal sphincter that won't relax (achalasia), having a steady habit of drinking very hot liquids, not eating enough fruits and vegetables, undergoing radiation treatment to the chest or upper abdomen.

Complications

As esophageal cancer advances, it can cause complications, such as:

  • Obstruction of the esophagus. Cancer may make it difficult or impossible for food and liquid to pass through your esophagus.

  • Pain. Advanced esophageal cancer can cause pain.

  • Bleeding in the esophagus. Esophageal cancer can cause bleeding. Though bleeding is usually gradual, it can be sudden and severe at times.

Diagnosis

Tests and procedures used to diagnose esophageal cancer include:

  • Using a scope to examine your esophagus (endoscopy). During endoscopy, your doctor passes a flexible tube equipped with a video lens (videoendoscope) down your throat and into your esophagus. Using the endoscope, your doctor examines your esophagus, looking for cancer or areas of irritation.

  • Collecting a sample of tissue for testing (biopsy). Your doctor may use a special scope passed down your throat into your esophagus (endoscope) to collect a sample of suspicious tissue (biopsy). The tissue sample is sent to a laboratory to look for cancer cells.

Esophageal cancer staging

When you're diagnosed with esophageal cancer, your doctor works to determine the extent (stage) of the cancer. Your cancer's stage helps determine your treatment options.

Tests used in staging esophageal cancer include endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computerized tomography (CT) scan and positron emission tomography (PET).

The stages of esophageal cancer are:

  • Stage in situ. Cancerous cells are visible microscopically on the lining of the esophagus but have not invaded the deeper parts of the inner lining of the esophagus.

  • Stage I. This cancer occurs in the superficial layers and has begun to invade the first layers of the inner lining of your esophagus and may have spread to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage II. The cancer has invaded deeper muscular layers of your esophagus and may have spread to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage III. The cancer has spread to the deepest layers of the wall of your esophagus — through the muscle layers — and to nearby tissues or lymph nodes.

  • Stage IV. The cancer has spread to other parts of your body.

Treatment

What treatments you receive for esophageal cancer are based on the type of cells involved in your cancer, your cancer's stage, your overall health and your preferences for treatment.

Surgery

Surgery to remove the cancer can be used alone or in combination with other treatments. Operations used to treat esophageal cancer include:

  • Surgery to remove very small tumors. If your cancer is very small, confined to the superficial layers of your esophagus and hasn't spread, your surgeon may recommend removing the cancer and margin of healthy tissue that surrounds it. Surgery can be done using an endoscope passed down your throat and into your esophagus.

  • Surgery to remove a portion of the esophagus (esophagectomy). During esophagectomy, your surgeon removes the portion of your esophagus that contains the tumor, along with a portion of the upper part of your stomach, and nearby lymph nodes. The remaining esophagus is reconnected to your stomach. Usually this is done by pulling the stomach up to meet the remaining esophagus.

  • Surgery to remove part of your esophagus and the upper portion of your stomach (esophagogastrectomy). During esophagogastrectomy, your surgeon removes part of your esophagus, nearby lymph nodes and a larger part of your stomach. The remainder of your stomach is then pulled up and reattached to your esophagus. If necessary, part of your colon is used to help join the two.

Esophageal cancer surgery carries a risk of serious complications, such as infection, bleeding and leakage from the area where the remaining esophagus is reattached to the stomach.

Surgery to remove your esophagus can be performed as an open procedure using large incisions or with special surgical tools inserted through several small incisions in your skin (laparoscopically). How your surgery is performed depends on your individual situation and your surgeon's particular approach to managing it.

Treatments for complications

Treatments for esophageal obstruction and difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) can include:

  • Relieving esophageal obstruction. If your esophageal cancer has narrowed your esophagus, a surgeon may use an endoscope and special tools to place a metal tube (stent) to hold the esophagus open. Other options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, laser therapy and photodynamic therapy.

  • Providing nutrition. Your doctor may recommend a feeding tube if you're having trouble swallowing or if you're having esophagus surgery. A feeding tube allows nutrition to be delivered directly to your stomach or small intestine, giving your esophagus time to heal after cancer treatment.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is drug treatment that uses chemicals to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs are typically used before (neoadjuvant) or after (adjuvant) surgery in people with esophageal cancer. Chemotherapy can also be combined with radiation therapy. In people with advanced cancer that has spread beyond the esophagus, chemotherapy may be used alone to help relieve signs and symptoms caused by the cancer.

The chemotherapy side effects that you experience depend on which chemotherapy drugs you receive.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy uses high-powered X-ray beams to kill cancer cells. Radiation typically will come from a machine outside your body that aims the beams at your cancer (external beam radiation). Or, less commonly, radiation can be placed inside your body near the cancer (brachytherapy).

Radiation therapy is most often combined with chemotherapy in people with esophageal cancer. It's typically used before surgery, or occasionally after surgery. Radiation therapy is also used to relieve complications of advanced esophageal cancer, such as when a tumor grows large enough to stop food from passing to your stomach. Treatment can last from two to six weeks of daily radiation treatments.

Side effects of radiation to the esophagus include sunburn-like skin reactions, painful or difficult swallowing, and accidental damage to nearby organs, such as the lungs and heart.

Combined chemotherapy and radiation

Combining chemotherapy and radiation therapy may enhance the effectiveness of each treatment. Combined chemotherapy and radiation may be the only treatment you receive, or combined therapy can be used before surgery. But combining chemotherapy and radiation treatments increases the likelihood and severity of side effects.

Alternative medicine

Complementary and alternative therapies may help you cope with the side effects of cancer and cancer treatment. For instance, people with esophageal cancer may experience pain caused by cancer treatment or by a growing tumor. Your doctor can work to control your pain by treating the cause or with medications. Still, pain may persist, and complementary and alternative therapies may help you cope.

Options include acupuncture, guided imagery, massage and relaxation techniques. Ask your doctor whether these options are safe for you.

Source: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/esophageal-cancer/diagnosis-treatment/treatment/txc-20309217

Liquid Nano Curcumin OIC is available in large pharmacies in Vietnam. Please contact our Customer Service Hotline at 1900636913 or access DISTRIBUTION CHANNELS to receive information of the nearest pharmacy.

The product is not a medicine and cannot replace medicines

Stomach diseases
upload/files/DA_DAY/a-diagram-showing-two-stomachs-representing-the-effects-of-gastroparesis.jpg

WHAT IS GASTROPARESIS?

Updated :18/05/2017 / 1433 Views

Gastroparesis is a condition in which your stomach cannot empty itself of food in a normal fashion. It can be caused by damage to the vagus n
Women after giving birth
upload/files/PHU_NU_SAU_SINH/Mom-Emotional-Photo-About-Her-Postpartum-Body.jpg

YOUR POSTPARTUM BODY - WHAT TO EXPECT

Updated :20/05/2017 / 1541 Views

Your body works hard in the weeks after the birth. Here's what's happening. During pregnancy, women usually look forward to the da

Send your question